177P/Barnard?

As the sky turned to fine,I observed the comet 177P/Barnard=P/2006 M3 (Barnard) just now.I don’t know it is true or just a phantom,I saw a very very diffuse and faint object about 1′ to the north of TYC2067-122-1,the star at the magnitude of 9.57.As I was not sure and tired,I did not do any measurement on this object,also the heavy light pollution makes the results valueless.If the weather and transparency keep fine,I will do more observation on the 177P comet.
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177P/Barnard?

Common Diary

Just now I searched for the SOHO comet in the C3 images.I could not find any suspected objects.As I know I am bad luck recently,I don not think I will discovery any comets in the next days,the only thing I can do is keeping finding and waiting and waiting.
By the way,I checked the positions of C/2006 M4 (SWAN) in SWAN images again.Here are the coordinates:
 
picture size: 640 * 480
picture name position
20060622.gif (374,336)
20060625.gif (376,334)
20060629.gif (372,331)
20060702.gif (375,328)
20060704.gif (376,325)
20060705.gif (377,324)
20060706.gif (378,322)
I could not find the position of the comet in the image of 20060620.gif though R. Matson said it did be there.
Telling the truth,I do not familiar with SWAN images.It is said that the transforming from the Ecliptic Coordinate into the Equatorial Coordinate is difficult,but I don’t think so,just using the spherics and the values,that’s all.The most difficut thing I think is fixing the precise coordinate because of SWAN’s low pixel.Anymore,I have a long way to improve my SWAN skills.
Uh——I’m very tired and sleepy.I’m sleeping.
Common Diary

Another SOHO/SWAN comet discovery!

July 21, 2006 — Another SOHO/SWAN comet discovery!

A slight underachiever by SOHO standards, the SOHO/SWAN instrument recently discovered its eight comet — C/2006 M4 (SWAN). The comet was found and reported independently by Rob Matson and Michael Mattiazzo. As with SWAN’s previous discovery, Rob Matson has been kind enough to share his discovery story, plus some images from Rob McNaught and Sebastian Hoenig.

"I first spotted the comet around 10:30 am exactly a week ago today when the 7/5 SWAN image was first posted. I should have spotted the comet a few days earlier, but as I later explained to Brian Marsden and Tim Spahr at MPC, I missed it because it was hugging one of the superimposed gridlines. By the time of the 7/5 image, though, the comet had enough separation from the grid line to draw attention to itself.

I e-mailed Eric Christensen at Catalina Sky Survey (with whom I’d been working on a different SWAN candidate) that our old phantom had disappeared, but had been replaced by something much more promising, and I would get back to him once I confirmed it wasn’t a known comet.

By 11 am I had checked known bright comets and found no matches, but wrote Eric back that due to the sky location, the southern hemisphere was the only hope for confirmation. I measured pixel positions for six nights from 6/20 to 7/5, converted to ecliptic coordinates and then to equatorial. I checked residuals on a parabolic orbital solution, tweaked a few positions until I was satisfied, and at 1:22 pm sent a discovery report and rough ephemeris to Brian and Tim Spahr at MPC. Ten minutes later I sent the same positions to Eric.

Since the southern hemisphere was the only hope for confirmation, the next step was to contact Rob McNaught and Gordon Garradd at Siding Spring Observatory to see what they could do. Like most observatories, SSO was down for full moon and wasn’t planning their next run until Thursday. But just in case, I sent Rob and Gordon predicted comet positions for Monday and Tuesday, and told them if no additional SWAN images appeared by Wednesday, I’d extend the ephemeris a few more days.

That evening I was able to check my e-mail and confirm that Tim had gotten my message; also, Rob replied that he would try for the comet on Thursday from the Uppsala telescope. There were no new SWAN images Tuesday so I went ahead and extended the ephemeris through Friday for Rob, running some excursions to give him an idea of positional uncertainty. A few hours later, Rob replied that Michael Matiazzo had independently found the same comet and reported it to him. He also indicated that he was thinking about heading up to SSO a day early if the weather cooperated.

Well, late Tuesday night (Wednesday afternoon for Australia) Rob informed me that Terry Lovejoy had located the comet in one of his June 30th survey images from Thornlands, QLD, and forwarded me Terry’s crop of an image stack showing a noticeably green cometary object. The weather had cleared sufficiently for Rob to make the decision to head up to Siding Spring, so I checked Terry’s position against my rough orbit to see if it needed some real-time tweaking before Rob made the recovery attempt. I didn’t have all of my astronomy tools on my laptop, but working from my hotel room I decided that my predicted position needed to shift a bit to the east and to the north. I forwarded the correction to Rob and at 1 am cross my fingers and called it a night.

Wednesday morning I got the blow-by-blow in a series of messages from Rob. The comet wasn’t at the nominal position (no surprise), but it was off by quite a bit more than I would have expected — nearly 3 degrees. Indeed — it is a testament to Rob’s skill and perseverance that he was able to spiral out and locate it before the comet set at his location."

Robert H.McNaught,RSAA/ANU, 2006                            S.Hoenig,J.C.Pelle,N.Teamo, 2006

 

The image on the left is a stack of four July 12th images taken with SSO’s 0.5-meter Uppsala Schmidt by Rob McNaught at Siding Spring, New South Wales.. 

The image on the right is a stack of 26 15-second exposures taken by Sebastian Hoenig, J.-C. Pelle and N.Teamo at the Hibiscus Obs in Tahiti.

It’s looking likely that C/2006 M4 (SWAN) will cross the LASCO field of view in August. The question, however, is whether it will be bright enough to see… More on this next week!(The original text is from http://ares.nrl.navy.mil/sungrazer/)

Another SOHO/SWAN comet discovery!

又丢了!

  或許是我的第四顆發現得過於幸運,老天有意讓我多受一下丟彗星的苦痛。這種苦痛也是暫時的,或許也是僅對像我這樣的人起作用的——既然心態浮躁,就磨一磨!

  這不,就在今天晚上(726),我剛練完書法,慢吞吞地打開電腦,來到了LASCO,發現沒停圖,下吧!我用Comethunter先導入了1042111812181242四張C3圖片,沒過5秒,我發現在蘇華的第100顆彗星下面有一個可疑目標!一量,是了!刷新報告頁——糟了,蘇華在我7分鐘之前報了!不久,KB就確認了他的目標。這是蘇的第101顆彗星。

  也許,這是老天有意安排,讓我多體驗一下這種SOHO特有的感覺(不知這麼說恰不恰當),讓我體驗一下周前輩的艱辛歷程——我這遠不及他的難。SOHO,就是這麼考驗一個人,弱者,毋經得考驗抑或數次即退;強者,雖說萬難,也不懼之,歷經磨練,卻為更強。我自然不想做前者,興明前輩在如此艱苦的條件下堅持尋彗,碎屢次差肩,亦自得其樂;池穀歷經數十載,飽受蚊蟲苦襲,不棄,終發現彗星……想想自己,丟一顆,沒啥大不了,丟兩顆,沒事!……這些都是小小的坎坷,未成荊棘叢,只不過山之坡耳。我堅信,只要堅持下去,總有一日會贏得幸運女神之眷顧,又一顆彗星即會到來!

 

又丢了!